Pulp repair: The reconstruction is done with granulation tissue — the pulp repairs itself, and does not regenerate itself!

Admin Dental Press

Edition V03N01 | Year 2013 | Editorial Original Article | Pages 9 to 42

Alberto Consolaro, Renata Bianco Consolaro

This paper aims at explaining, sequentially and in an integrated manner, pulp biology and its clinical applicability in understanding pulp repair after operative procedures have been carried out in the coronary region, as well as in the apical tissues. It also aims at substantiating what influences the choice of technique, the most opportune time for intervention and which material should be used. The dentin-pulp complex represents a single structure in the human body, with very specific characteristics. Pulp injuries are common in clinical practice and their repair involves the reorganization with new matrix production, forming mineralized tissue barriers and a new odontoblastic layer. The morphology of the newly formed dentin can be identified by several names, among which is tertiary dentin. As important as the coronary and apical pulp injuries that will be repaired, are the situations in which one wishes to repair teeth with incomplete root formation. The pulp biology and its implications in pulp repair are of great interest for all specialties, since they influence the outcome of every clinical case.

Dental pulp, Pulp repair, Incomplete root formation, Dentin,

Consolaro A, Consolaro RB. Pulp repair: The reconstruction is done with granulation tissue — the pulp repairs itself, and does not regenerate itself! Dental Press Endod. 2013 Jan-Apr;3(1):9-42.

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